Katana: Echizen Ju Harima Daijo Fujiwara Shigetaka (2nd generation)

Ordering number: AS20271
Katana in Shirasaya (NBTHK Hozon Token)
Signature : Echizen Ju Harima Daijo Fujiwara Shigetaka (2nd generation)

Shinto: Chu Jyo Saku: Echizen.
(We divide 4 sections for each sword as Saijyo saku, Jyo-jyo saku Jyo saku and regular
saku)
This sword belongs to Jyo Jyo Saku ranking.
The blade was polished.
Habaki: silver foiled single Habaki.
Blade length: 66.7 cm or 26.26 inches.
Sori : 0,9 cm or 0.354 inches.
Mekugi: 1
Width at the hamachi: 3,0 cm or 1.18 inches.
Width at the Kissaki: 2.1cm or 0.83inches.
Kasane : 0.6 cm or 0.24 inches.
The weight of the sword 615 grams.
Era : Edo period Kanbun era 1661.
Shape: The blade is regular width thickness with small sori which is called Kanbun shape.
Jigane: Koitame hada well grained with Jinie attach very soft heeling texture.
Hamon: Nie deki round shape gnome Midare with ash.
bo-shi: round shape.

Special feature: Echizen Jyu Harima Daijyo I Fujiwara Shigetaka was active in the first
generation around Kan-ei, and the second generation is this work.
The taste was a little different from the original work, and the style was a Kanbun
shaped sword and the warp(sori) was shallow from that time.
It is said that the popular sword method of poking was popular, and the Kotetsu
swordsmith and Edo Honyo-ji school etc. have the same appearance.

From Aoi Art: It is thought that Shigetaka 2nd generation probably had an exchange
with Yasutsugu, and there is also a work in which Nanban iron is carved on the Jigane.
It is probable that from the Kan-ei era when the warp(Sugata) was slightly shallow and the swords grew, the swordsman era changed to a tactic of piercing the swords with a
short (shape), and the background of the era was transmitted earlier. Starting with
Kotetsu sword maker and new Edo swords, swords with this shape became popular in
many regions.

NBTHK Hozon Token
Aoi Art estimation paper
Whole Oshigata.

Auction starting Price: 350,000 JPY-.

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